Our cause

 

 

Today more than ever, we must continue to encourage young people living in OMHM housing to stay in school and give them the tools to succeed.

 

Why give?

Testimonials

Growing up in housing managed by the OMHM

Our cause
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Our cause

Today more than ever, we must continue to encourage young people living in OMHM housing to stay in school and give them the tools to succeed.

Tomorrow’s society, and that of the young people who will become its active members, requires access to education and academic success. Promoting school perseverance is, without a doubt, the most productive investment to secure a bright collective future.

However, too many students still fall through the cracks of the system, especially those living in poverty. It is therefore necessary to work together and foster their interest in school, thus ensuring their success.

Tomorrow’s society, and that of the young people who will become its active members, requires access to education and academic success. Promoting school perseverance is, without a doubt, the most productive investment to secure a bright collective future.

However, too many students still fall through the cracks of the system, especially those living in poverty. It is therefore necessary to work together and foster their interest in school, thus ensuring their success.

Why give?

When we speak of school perseverance, we are talking about one’s capacity to pursue studies and to earn a first diploma or qualification.

School perseverance is a key factor in making our children successful—its effects lasting a lifetime, in particular, in achieving satisfactory living conditions. The pandemic has had a devastating effect on school performance particularly for underprivileged youth. In December 2020, the failure rate of secondary school students was three to five times higher than it was the previous year reaching 30% to 50% in some areas (La Presse 2020). The situation is worrisome.

It is to be noted that dropping out of school is associated with a student’s socioeconomic vulnerability. The average annual income of a family living in OMHM housing is less than $20,000.

 

Investing in school perseverance is a winning solution for all!

A high school graduate is more likely to have better living conditions and rewarding experiences than a student who does not graduate. He or she contributes to the vitality of society (electoral participation, volunteering, blood donation, etc.) and helps maintain a more stable labour market (ensuring essential jobs necessary for Montreal’s economy). Society can thus make an economic gain over a person’s entire working life.

 

Dropping out of school has a cost to society and increases inequalities between the less and the more fortunate.

Dropping out of school has devastating consequences both on the individual’s quality of life and health but also on the collective economy.

One of the most striking inequalities is that those who dropped out of their studies are more susceptible to face health issues and have a 7-year-shorter life expectancy than high school graduates. In addition, their employment income is 31% lower than a graduate’s salary.

According to Le Réseau Réussite Montréal, 30% of dropouts do not take part in the workforce resulting in higher social assistance costs. They represent more than 2/3 of the beneficiaries of social assistance programs. Dropping out of school also deprives the Montreal economy of millions of dollars.

In addition, statistics show that there is an increase in crime among those who have not completed high school and some, 62% of individuals who pass through the prison system are dropouts.

 

By donating, it is individually that we can make a collective difference for these young Montrealers.

The Foundation invests in school perseverance, by offering financial support to organizations working with youngsters living in OMHM housing and awarding individual grants to students through a scholarship program.

We encourage inclusive education and the full development of our youth’s potential, in addition to encouraging initiative and creativity and promoting a sense of pride and self-worth.

We strongly believe it is our responsibility to make our city one in which every young person can succeed, regardless of their socioeconomic background.

 

DONATE

Testimonials

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Jasmine

JASMINE – 10 YEARS OLD
Primary school student

I’m a 4th-grader at the Adélard-Desrosiers School in Montréal-Nord. I think that school is important in life and that we should not give up despite its challenges and COVID. I am registered in the Success Club of Coup de pouce jeunesse and it has helped me a lot. I enjoy homework tutoring sessions because there are snacks and an environment in which I am motivated to do my homework. At home, I am not motivated and have no one to help when I don’t understand what I have to do. It also helps me succeed and have better grades. I used to fail often, especially in French. Now, my grades are up and the support I receive is important to me. It helps me succeed and persevere. Outside of school, I love to sing. One day, I’d like to sing for a living.

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Megann

MEGANN - 12 YEARS OLD
Primary school student

I attend Comité de vie de quartier Duff-Court’s homework tutoring sessions twice a week. Carilyn, Hélène or Javier help me with my math, French and English homework. In school, things are going well but I struggle in math and English. I really like my Specialized Education Technicians, Ms. Michèle, Ms. Marie-Ève, Mr. Frédéric. They help work out my disagreements with other students and manage my school routine. School has become a bore with all the sanitary measures put in place like wearing a mask all day except at lunchtime. I see my friends less. When I grow up, I’d like to become a doctor. I’m thinking about it!

Christine, Megann’s mother, praising homework tutoring and what it has done for Megann :
« Megann is quite shy. Homework tutoring helps her be more responsible and encourages her to socialize with peers. In the beginning, I had to push her out the door, but today, she happily goes to the workshops on her own and I see a great difference at home. It is very important for her development and I’m happy she has the opportunity take part in such activities that greatly help her in ways that go beyond her homework. »

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Chelsea

CHELSEA - 11 YEARS OLD
Primary school student

I go to Alphonse-Desjardins School and have been going to homework tutoring workshops given by the Petite-Côte Community Centre for several years. Tutoring helps me a lot and the people there are nice, understanding and patient. I really like Lucie, my instructor. She is friendly and smart and enjoys helping me with my homework. When I’m working on something, I don’t get discouraged, I never give up. I keep on going because I want to finish my elementary school years and that keeps me motivated. I later see myself play basketball for a living … and rap!

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Terron

TERRON - 12 YEARS OLD
Primary school student

I live with my father and have eight brothers and sisters, aged between 4 and 35 who live with my mother or have left the household. I go to COVIQ’s homework tutoring sessions and it helps me a lot with my schoolwork. This year, because of COVID, French and math are harder for me. Through the help I receive with homework assistance, I understand more and am prouder of myself, especially in math. I find it more complicated to study and learn in school because of the sanitary measures put in place. School is less stimulating than before. When I grow up, I’d like to be a YouTuber or a basketball player.

Growing up in housing managed by the Office municipal d’habitation de Montréal
en HLM

 

GROWING UP IN HOUSING MANAGED BY THE OFFICE MUNICIPAL D'HABITATION DE MONTRÉAL

Nearly 10,000 young people under 25 live in OMHM housing spread across 16 of Montréal’s 19 boroughs. More than two thirds are of school age, 33% are in elementary school and 34% are in high school. In some neighbourhoods, more than half of these young people drop out of school without obtaining a high school diploma. Despite the help that subsidized housing may provide, the vast majority of families in low-rent housing communities live in extreme poverty and social exclusion and earn an average annual income of less than $20,000.

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Portrait des jeunes en HLM

More than half of the families are single-parent families and 75% of the single-parent families are headed by women.

These families’ economic situation have a significant impact on their youngsters’ chances to succeed. The school dropout rate is two and a half times higher in disadvantaged areas than elsewhere.

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